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Still roaming around in an anthropocentric world view, it has become inevitable that we rethink and reshape human behaviour with the many forms of co-existences on this planet – if we want it to flourish in the long term. We are part of a complex, interwoven network; We do not have to “go back to nature” – expressions like this just demonstrate how distorted our view is. We are not disconnected – we have never not been part of this web. What we have to do is become aware of it. There is no passive background; every form of existence shapes and influences the reality we experience. Every existence has some kind of liveliness in it, no matter whether its influence is intentional or not. Or, as Bruno Latour puts it: Being a subject doesn’t mean acting autonomously on an objective frame but sharing ones impact with other subjects. 

 

One of these subjects are glaciers. Being visual climate thermometers, they are usually portrayed and talked about from that perspective. This project examines the many ways of glacial expression, the diverse shapes and colours they assume, how they influence their surroundings and how they mingle with it. I look at glaciers as living beings, as active protagonists in the web of reality. Glaciers are born out of the permanent metamorphosis from snow to ice. They are uniquely dynamic; viscous and brittle at the same time. From the human perspective, we can only ever perceive slices of them; they exist in a different time dimension, so vastly different that it goes beyond human grasp. With bacteria and algae teeming on their backs, they make their way down. 

 

A Timlapse recorded over the course of four months, from February until June 2022, at the Fee Glacier in Saas-Fee, Switzerland. The camera was programmed to take a picture every hour.

This Timelapse allows humans to enter a non-human time-dimension; to perceive from a non-human perspective – in that case the dynamic motion of a glacier

Shown in an installation, it is projected onto a phyiscal model of said glacier.

The Glacier Is a Being (2023)

Still roaming around in an anthropocentric world view, it has become inevitable that we rethink and reshape human behaviour with the many forms of co-existences on this planet – if we want it to flourish in the long term. We are part of a complex, interwoven network; We do not have to “go back to nature” – expressions like this just demonstrate how distorted our view is. We are not disconnected – we have never not been part of this web. What we have to do is become aware of it. There is no passive background; every form of existence shapes and influences the reality we experience. Every existence has some kind of liveliness in it, no matter whether its influence is intentional or not. Or, as Bruno Latour puts it: Being a subject doesn’t mean acting autonomously on an objective frame but sharing ones impact with other subjects. 

 

One of these subjects are glaciers. Being visual climate thermometers, they are usually portrayed and talked about from that perspective. This project examines the many ways of glacial expression, the diverse shapes and colours they assume, how they influence their surroundings and how they mingle with it. I look at glaciers as living beings, as active protagonists in the web of reality. Glaciers are born out of the permanent metamorphosis from snow to ice. They are uniquely dynamic; viscous and brittle at the same time. From the human perspective, we can only ever perceive slices of them; they exist in a different time dimension, so vastly different that it goes beyond human grasp. With bacteria and algae teeming on their backs, they make their way down. 

 

A Timlapse recorded over the course of four months, from February until June 2022, at the Fee Glacier in Saas-Fee, Switzerland. The camera was programmed to take a picture every hour.

This Timelapse allows humans to enter a non-human time-dimension; to perceive from a non-human perspective – in that case the dynamic motion of a glacier

Shown in an installation, it is projected onto a phyiscal model of said glacier.

The Glacier Is a Being (2023)

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